October12014
underthescopemin:

Hemimorphite
Yellow-brown hemimorphite and fluorite.Photo and collection Jean-Marie Calandreau

underthescopemin:

Hemimorphite

Yellow-brown hemimorphite and fluorite.

Photo and collection Jean-Marie Calandreau

4PM
4PM
3PM
2PM
rockon-ro:

GREEN BLUECAP TOURMALINE from Brazil. Photo taken with a microscope at 10X magnification. The blue cap is seen on the top of the crystal.

rockon-ro:

GREEN BLUECAP TOURMALINE from Brazil. Photo taken with a microscope at 10X magnification. The blue cap is seen on the top of the crystal.

12PM

David Rumsey Historical Map Collection
1850 Star Chart

(Source: itschis, via the-actual-universe)

11AM
10AM
humanoidhistory:

Wongaksa Pagoda, Seoul, South Korea, built in 1467, photographed in 1884 by Percival Lowell.(Harvard Library)

humanoidhistory:

Wongaksa Pagoda, Seoul, South Korea, built in 1467, photographed in 1884 by Percival Lowell.

(Harvard Library)

9AM

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Colombian Amber with insects - Santander, Colombia

(Source: carionmineraux.com)

2AM

Also got to love it when tumblr recommends blogs you didn’t realize were unfollowed for you at some point?

2AM

In terms of non-spoilery stuff I will say that I’m not sure I quite like the new art direction they went with instead of the way they did 999.

I mean the 3D models are good enough while actually talking to people but in the stills they seem a bit weird looking. The drawn stuff they used in 999 showed what was going on a bit better, I think.

2AM

More VLR spoilers after some uh… “endings” I guess?

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September302014
gentlemanbones:

These almond cookies are very aggressive.

gentlemanbones:

These almond cookies are very aggressive.

(Source: reddit.com, via orbitalstrife)

10PM
ifuckingloveminerals:

Cerussite
Clara Mine, Rankach valley, Oberwolfach, Wolfach, Black Forest, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

ifuckingloveminerals:

Cerussite

Clara Mine, Rankach valley, Oberwolfach, Wolfach, Black Forest, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

(via beautiful-minerals)

9PM
the-actual-universe:

Second Place Looks Pretty GoodSpiral galaxy NGC 6872 lies roughly 300 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Pavo (The Peacock). It dominates the scene in this image taken using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. WIth its bright disk on the lower right and the long upper arm of the spiral trailing off to the left, it is beautiful sight.In terms of size, NGC 6872 ranks as the second largest spiral galaxy found thus far. It spans over 500,000 light-years across, or about five times the size of our own Milky Way. But it is still less than half the size of the current reigning champion on the spiral galaxy size scale, which is NGC 262 at a diameter of 1.3 million light-years. The long upper arm of NGC 6872 owes some of its distorted shape and diffuse coloration to the smaller IC 4970, seen just above the main disk of our second place finisher. In the fairly recent past (perhaps 130 million years ago), the smaller galaxy passed through this arm, teasing material into the ragged form we see today. That passage also triggered new star formation, which appears blue in this image.Second place looks pretty good from where I’m sitting.-JFImage credit: ESA/Hubble and NASASource

the-actual-universe:

Second Place Looks Pretty Good

Spiral galaxy NGC 6872 lies roughly 300 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Pavo (The Peacock). It dominates the scene in this image taken using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. WIth its bright disk on the lower right and the long upper arm of the spiral trailing off to the left, it is beautiful sight.

In terms of size, NGC 6872 ranks as the second largest spiral galaxy found thus far. It spans over 500,000 light-years across, or about five times the size of our own Milky Way. But it is still less than half the size of the current reigning champion on the spiral galaxy size scale, which is NGC 262 at a diameter of 1.3 million light-years. 

The long upper arm of NGC 6872 owes some of its distorted shape and diffuse coloration to the smaller IC 4970, seen just above the main disk of our second place finisher. In the fairly recent past (perhaps 130 million years ago), the smaller galaxy passed through this arm, teasing material into the ragged form we see today. That passage also triggered new star formation, which appears blue in this image.

Second place looks pretty good from where I’m sitting.

-JF

Image credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA

Source
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